Gold Coast Snake Catcher monthly wrap up Blog:

Information on recent snake catching and relocation call outs.

White-crowned snake

Gold Coast Snake Catcher monthly wrap up:

September 2016 snake catcher activity

Our snake catcher Gold Coast has started off the spring with a number of excellent captures. As is always the case Carpet Pythons comprise the bulk of captures, however some large Eastern Brown Snakes and Red Bellied Black snakes have also been captured and relocated. The largest Eastern Brown snake measuring 1.7 metres was captured in a car engine bay at Mudgeeraba and took a bit of coaxing to remove. Other locations include Runaway Bay, Hope Island, Coomera and Maudsland. We expect to see more of these as the peak mating period arrives in October.

September 2016 snake catcher activity

Our snake catcher Gold Coast has started off the spring with a number of excellent captures. As is always the case Carpet Pythons comprise the bulk of captures, however some large Eastern Brown Snakes and Red Bellied Black snakes have also been captured and relocated. The largest Eastern Brown snake measuring 1.7 metres was captured in a car engine bay at Mudgeeraba and took a bit of coaxing to remove. Other locations include Runaway Bay, Hope Island, Coomera and Maudsland. We expect to see more of these as the peak mating period arrives in October.

June 2016 snake catcher activity

The cooler weather is starting to embrace the Gold Coast, bringing with it a marked decrease in the number of snake sightings and call-outs, as is typical for this time of year. Coastal Carpet Pythons and Common Tree Snakes have again been the usual suspects, as they are commonly encountered while out in warm, sunny spots for thermoregulation or hunting a wintery meal. Suburbs for Carpet Python and Common Tree Snake captures have included Nerang, Elanora, Mudgeeraba, Currumbin Waters and Robina.

It’s also that time of year when we are often contacted regarding snakes in ceiling spaces, as species such a Carpet Pythons will often take up residence in roofs. Remember, we are available for roof inspections should you have concerns about a snake in your roof.

Other snake species encountered have included a Keelback from Robina and a Small-eyed Snake from Bonogin.

May 2016 snake catcher activity

Snake activity is starting to slow up on the Gold Coast with the commencement of the cooler months. As is typical, the most commonly encountered species have been Common Tree Snakes and Coastal Carpet Pythons with captures recorded from Carrara, Nerang, Broadbeach Waters, Reedy Creek, Bundall and Parkwood.

Of the venomous species, an Eastern Brown Snake was relocated from Upper Coomera and an interesting encounter also occurred at a different property in Upper Coomera where an Eastern Brown Snake was sighted on the roof of a residential house. Contrary to popular belief, venomous snake can climb, however a scenario such as this involving the Eastern Brown Snake is quite a rare occurrence. Snakes in these sort of situations can be very difficult to catch due to their high agility and mobility and our snake catcher was unfortunately unable to locate the snake in this case.

Remember, keep our number handy in the event you need a snake catcher. We can be contacted 24/7 on 0418 738 228

May 2015 snake catcher activity

Snake activity is starting to slow up on the Gold Coast with the onset of the cooler, winter months. It’s a bit of a myth that snakes hibernate over winter – they don’t – they just become less active, but are still seen thermo-regulating by getting some sunshine. The usual suspects such as Common Tree Snakes and Coastal Carpet Pythons are still out and about quite often with venomous snake relocations including a Small-eyed Snake from Willowvale, a Yellow-faced Whip Snake from Chambers Flat and even a Rough-scaled Snake from Eagle Heights.

March 2015 snake catcher activity

Snake activity has started to slow down at Gold Coast with some sporadic rain events and the weather starting to get a little cooler. The most frequently captured snakes have again been the Coastal Carpet Pythons and the Common Tree Snakes, with Mudgeeraba, Coomera, Wongawallan, Tamborine and Helensvale being very active. A Common Tree Snake was also caught from Australia Fair Shopping Centre at Southport and released in more suitable habitat (and away from shoppers!).

Eastern Brown Snakes, including quite a few juveniles, have also been making appearances in various suburbs. A juvenile Eastern Brown Snake was removed from a house in Pimpama where it was hiding behind a pot plant just inside the front door and a large Eastern Brown was removed from behind a toilet at Ormeau. An Eastern Brown Snake in a confined space such as a toilet could respond with a bite if it felt intimidated enough. Eastern Brown Snakes, in these sorts of situations, are particularly defensive. For 24 hour snake emergencies contact 0418 738 228

December 2014 snake catcher activity

The heat of December typically sees a slight reduction in the number of snakes sighted during the day and a marked increase in the movement of nocturnal snakes. Two Golden-crowned Snakes were found this month in the suburbs of Tamborine and Currumbin. Being strictly nocturnal they are a good indicator of increased night time movement. Other less frequently encountered nocturnal snakes noted include two Dwarf Crowned Snakes from Beechmont and Tugun, a large Eastern small-eyed Snakes from Mudgeeraba and a Rough-scaled Snake from a home near Canungra.

Venomous species are most certainly on the move with some sizeable snakes being recorded. We have seen two Eastern Brown Snakes this month that were in excess of 1500mm or 5 ft in the old scale. The largest was a 1700mm specimen captured at Upper Coomera.

A photo was sent in for identification that showed two Yellow faced Whip Snakes in the throngs of male/male combat. Although the photo wasn’t taken on the Gold Coast his is a clear indicator that this species is still in a reproductive mode. This species is one of the more common of our smaller venomous species found throughout many Gold Coast suburbs.

Of course the ever reliable Carpet Pythons are making themselves known with the most impressive a 2.5 metre specimen recorded by our snake catcher at Mudgeeraba.

November 2014 snake catcher activity

Our Gold Coast Snake Catcher has had a busy month with increased snake call-outs. Coastal Carpet Pythons and Common Tree Snakes have again been “the usual suspects” with snakes caught and relocated from many suburbs including Pacific Pines, Labrador, Tugun, Varsity Lakes, Coomera, Mudgeeraba and Oxenford.

A number of venomous snakes including a 5 foot Eastern Brown Snake from Coomera, have been removed and relocated from backyard chook pens throughout various suburbs. It’s always a good idea to be mindful of snakes when collecting those eggs and keep our numbers handy should you need our assistance in the event of a scaly visitor.

October 2014 snake catcher activity

Our Gold Coast Snake Catchers had a busy month with October delivering an increase in snake sightings and call-outs.

Coastal Carpet Pythons have again been the most frequently caught snakes; however Common Tree Snakes and Brown Tree Snakes have also been out and about. A Common Tree Snake recently hitched a ride to a shopping centre at Benowa where our Gold Coast snake catcher removed it from the car. The snake gave the driver quite a fright as she was exiting the car on arrival and was glad she didn’t have to share the ride home with the hitch-hiker.

Some good-sized snakes have been captured throughout the region with a 6ft Eastern Brown Snake removed from a property at South Maclean. The scaly visitor was hiding in a wood pile and the property owners were very thankful to have the snake removed! Remember to always be careful when moving anything such as wood piles, particularly if they have been undisturbed for a while. Other localities featuring Eastern Brown Snake captures this month include Surfers Paradise, Mudgeeraba, Upper Coomera, Southport, Arundel, Nerang and Pimpama.

September 2014 snake catcher activity

And here we go!! Gold Coast snakes have kicked off with a bang with reproductive and feeding activity well and truly in full swing. Carpet Pythons, Common Tree Snakes and Keelback Snakes are by far the most prevalent at the moment. All are harmless species but the numbers cited are certainly on the rise. Probably the most interesting call was a group of five Tree Snakes in a laundry at Upper Coomera. The female had ventured on into the house only to be followed up by four very eager wannabe suitors. The writhing mass was enough to cause concern and the local Gold Coast Snake Catcher was called in. All were removed and allowed to continue the shenanigans in another location.

Usually October sees the most movement for Eastern Brown Snakes however a few have been turning up. Capture locations include Mudgeeraba, Nerang, Miami, Burleigh, Sanctuary Cove and Hope Island. The most impressive snake was a 1700mm Eastern Brown taken from a living room at Hope Island. This snake had made its way through a verandah screen door and was witnessed by the homeowners making entry. Remember to keep those screens closed!

August 2014 snake catcher activity

As usual the Gold Coast snakes move a little earlier after winter than those further inland. A nice common tree snake was removed from an air conditioning unit 2 stories up in Miami. The snake made an appearance through the vents late in the night when the heater was turned on. The Gold Coast Snake Catcher was called and promptly attended for relocation. A Carpet Python made its way into a washing machine at Ashmore and a kitchen cupboard at Burleigh.

One of the many venomous snakes caught this month was a 5ft long Red Bellied Black Snake from inside of a car. The driver noticed the snake whilst driving moving across the floor under her feet!! Needless to say she pulled over and had the snake catcher do a roadside removal!

July 2014snake catcher activity

The snake activity has slowed dramatically on the Gold Coast but a few notable captures have been reported by the Gold Coast Snake Catcher. Carpet pythons dominated the snakes caught with a one snake removed from a Surfers Paradise backyard showing considerable injuries from an accident with a whipper snipper. This snake was admitted to wildlife care by a specialist snake rehabilitator and all reports sugest the unlucky python will be released in the next 3 weeks. A flying fox fell prey to a 2100mm carpet python at Mudgeeraba and a 1400mm specimen was removed from an internal bookcase at Hope Island. A 1650mm Common Tree Snake made its way into a fax machine at a home office in Ormeau. The snake catcher played handyman to remove it from inside the machine.

Only one venomous snake required relocation; a Yellow-faced Whip Snake that had fallen into a backyard swimming pool at Arundel.

As August gets going expect snakes to be moving considerably more than the previous couple of months. Have your Snake Catcher Gold Coast number handy ( 0418 738 228) in case you need them!

June 2014 snake catcher activity

With winter well and truly on us June saw a notable decline in snake related enquiries. Carpet Pythons were by far the most common snake enquired of with captures recorded in Mudgeeraba, Nerang, Surfers Paradise and Burleigh Heads. Most of these snakes were captured during the day basking in close vicinity to suitable refuge for longer term winter localities. Rock retainer walls and roof tops comprise the main places to find sedentary carpet pythons at this time of year in the suburban landscape. A Common Tree Snake was removed from a fax machine at a business in Currumbin with another at a Tugun home removed by a snake catcher as it lay across a window sill.

As is typical for this time of year venomous snakes are less frequent captures. A 1200mm Eastern Brown from a home in Ormeau and a large 550mm Golden crowned snake from Wongawallan were the only reported captures.

April 2014 snake catcher activity

April has seen a reduction in the frequency of snake removals for snake catchers of the Gold Coast. Although this is typical for this time of year the "usual offenders" keep popping up most notably the Carpet Pythons and Common Tree Snakes. As our most common suburban snakes both species still find their way into homes or gardens with regularity. Carpet pythons are well known for utilising the roof and wall spaces of suburban homes and will start to make their way into those localities that will support them for the upcoming cooler months. Carpet python captures this month include Nerang, Coomera, Helensvale, Mudgeeraba, Currumbin, Burleigh Heads, Tugun, Mount Tamborine and Springbrook.

A Yellow-faced Whip Snake caused a little bit of a stir at Burleigh heads where it made its way into a shopping complex. Although the species is a relatively small and slender snake this particular snake made its way through a number of business before the gold coast snake catcher arrived to remove it. A number of curious shoppers were there to witness the capture. At Currumbin we had a 2.5 metre Carpet Python eating a Brush-tail Possum at 3 am that woke the neighbourhood dogs and subsequently the home occupiers. The snake had just finished the meal when the snake catcher arrived.

The most interesting capture was a Rough-scaled Snake from a verandah at Mt Tamborine. This species is generally associated with suburbs in the Gold Coast Hinterland rather than the more coastal areas. The species is not a common capture for the snake catcher Gold Coast based.

February 2014 snake catcher activity

Things certainly got a little interesting on the Gold Coast with some excellent snake captures from a number of suburbs. Eastern Brown Snakes featured highly with 4 juvenile snakes found in swimming pools. These were from the suburbs of Hope Island, Coomera, Nerang and Surfers Paradise. The small size of these snakes means that when they fall into backyard pools they often cannot get back out. This could be a deadly circumstance if an unsuspecting swimmer was to accidentally bump into it.

The largest Carpet python caught for the month of February was from Ormeau. This beastie went 2.6metres which is a reasonable sized carpet python. With a solid girth the snake was estimated at around 6 kilograms. As per usual there were a number of removals reported by the Gold Coast Snake Catcher were for Common Tree Snakes in suburbs such as Ashmore, Burleigh Heads. Tallebudgera and Currumbin. Most of these snakes were inside homes which is typical for this very active snake species.

Notable captures include an Eastern Small-eyed Snake from Mudgeeraba, but more interestingly was a Red-bellied black snake capture from Coomera waters. When the snake catcher arrived he found the snake attempting to devour a goldfish which it had successfully captured in a backyard pond! Unfortunately it was disturbed before it consumed the fish and was subsequently captured and bagged for later release. Another surprising capture was a 2.4 metre Black-headed Python which was caught at a set of units in Mudgeeraba. The snake was an obvious escaped captive as it does not naturally occur in the area. The owner was tracked down and the snake safely returned to its enclosure. One very thankful snake keeper!

January 2014 snake catcher activity

Activity in January increased slightly on December with some sporadic rain events spurring on a little more nocturnal movement. Hatchling carpet pythons have begun to turn up in locations such as Burleigh and Currumbin. This will be a more frequent encounter for snake catchers on the Gold Coast in the weeks to come.

A reminder to small pet owners when considering snake activity around the home would be the 2200mm carpet python that took a cat at Helensvale. Remember to alternate the location you feed small pets in to avoid this most unfortunate situation or simply feed them inside.

The most notable capture was a 1700mm Red-bellied Black Snake from a yard at Mudgeeraba. A spectacular snake by anyone's standard.

December 2013 snake catcher activity

Well February had a few small surprises for our Brisbane and Ipswich snake catchers. A 2.9 metre carpet python was removed from a chook pen at The Gap after it successfully managed to gain entry into what the property owners believed was a secure and snake proof chook house. The entry point was via the roof where two nails had failed allowing the snake to force its way in. A 1.6 metre Eastern Brown Snake was caught by the Northside snake catcher from the suburb of Warner. This particular snake was in the kitchen of an elderly woman who was most upset by the snakes presence. The snake catcher was able to bag the snake quickly and allay her fears with some solid advice.

In Ipswich, we had a Red bellied Black Snake removed from the Trade Secret store in West Ipswich and a very large Common Tree Snake from a lounge room in Yamanto home. A snake was removed from a toilet in East Ipswich with the story making its way to the local newspaper. Unfortunately it was reported incorrectly as a Diamond python when in actual fact it was a Carpet Python.

The most notable capture was a Dwarf Crowned Snake removed from a home in Chelmer. This species is one of the smallest locally and is rarely seen. It was brought inside the house by the household cat at night. Another reminder why cats are better off inside of an evening rather than roaming around for little gifts to bring home to their respective owners!

January 2014 snake catcher activity

Brisbane Snake catcher activity in January increased slightly on December with some sporadic rain events spurring on a little more nocturnal movement. Hatchling carpet pythons were on the go with a clutch hatching from Kenmore a highlight for snake catching team. Visit our facebook page to see more of this amazing event.

A small dog was taken by a large carpet python removed from a backyard in Chapel Hill and a cat in Bardon. Remember to alternate the location you feed small pets in to avoid this most unfortunate situation or simply feed them inside.

The most notable capture was a Red-naped snake from Goodna. This species is regarded as common but infrequently recorded by snake catchers Brisbane based.

December 2013 snake catcher activity

The month of December has been drier than expected with minimal rain resulting in a general suppression of peak snake activity. Gold coast Snake catchers have reported fewer snake removals than previous December periods with the most prevalent species being Carpet Pythons and Common Tree Snakes.

Suburbs such as Southport and Coomera saw multiple carpet python captures with a tidy 2400mm specimen removed from a garden shed by one of our snake catchers in Arundel. A nice Eastern Brown Snake around 1800mm was taken from a Tallebudgeera home.

A notable capture was a Rough scaled Snake from a home in Springbrook. Although historically recorded in the area this species is not commonly seen by Gold Coast snake catchers.

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